Eastern Standard Tribe – Day 3 of 64

4.

April 3, 2022 was the day that Art nearly killed the first and only woman he ever really loved. It was her fault.

Art’s car was running low on lard after a week in the Benelux countries, where the residents were all high-net-worth cholesterol-conscious codgers who guarded their arteries from the depredations of the frytrap as jealously as they squirreled their money away from the taxman. He was, therefore, thrilled and delighted to be back on British soil, Greenwich+0, where grease ran like water and his runabout could be kept easily and cheaply fuelled and the vodka could run down his gullet instead of into his tank.

He was in the Kensington High Street on a sleepy Sunday morning, GMT0300h—2100h back in EDT—and the GPS was showing insufficient data-points to even gauge traffic between his geoloc and the Camden High where he kept his rooms. When the GPS can’t find enough peers on the relay network to color its maps with traffic data, you know you’ve hit a sweet spot in the city’s uber-circadian, a moment of grace where the roads are very nearly exclusively yours.

So he whistled a jaunty tune and swilled his coffium, a fad that had just made it to the UK, thanks to the loosening of rules governing the disposal of heavy water in the EU. The java just wouldn’t cool off, remaining hot enough to guarantee optimal caffeine osmosis right down to the last drop.

If he was jittery, it was no more so than was customary for ESTalists at GMT+0, and he was driving safely and with due caution. If the woman had looked out before stepping off the kerb and into the anemically thin road, if she hadn’t been wearing stylish black in the pitchy dark of the curve before the Royal Garden Hotel, if she hadn’t stepped right in front of his runabout, he would have merely swerved and sworn and given her a bit of a fright.

But she didn’t, she was, she did, and he kicked the brake as hard as he could, twisted the wheel likewise, and still clipped her hipside and sent her ass-over-teakettle before the runabout did its own barrel roll, making three complete revolutions across the Kensington High before lodging in the Royal Garden Hotel’s shrubs. Art was covered in scorching, molten coffium, screaming and clawing at his eyes, upside down, when the porters from the Royal Garden opened his runabout’s upside-down door, undid his safety harness and pulled him out from behind the rapidly flacciding airbag. They plunged his face into the ornamental birdbath, which had a skin of ice that shattered on his nose and jangled against his jawbone as the icy water cooled the coffium and stopped the terrible, terrible burning.

He ended up on his knees, sputtering and blowing and shivering, and cleared his eyes in time to see the woman he’d hit being carried out of the middle of the road on a human travois made of the porters’ linked arms of red wool and gold brocade.

“Assholes!” she was hollering. “I could have a goddamn spinal injury! You’re not supposed to move me!”

“Look, Miss,” one porter said, a young chap with the kind of fantastic dentition that only an insecure teabag would ever pay for, teeth so white and flawless they strobed in the sodium streetlamps. “Look. We can leave you in the middle of the road, right, and not move you, like we’re supposed to. But if we do that, chances are you’re going to get run over before the paramedics get here, and then you certainly will have a spinal injury, and a crushed skull besides, like as not. Do you follow me?”

“You!” she said, pointing a long and accusing finger at Art. “You! Don’t you watch where you’re going, you fool! You could have killed me!”

Art shook water off his face and blew a mist from his dripping moustache. “Sorry,” he said, weakly. She had an American accent, Californian maybe, a litigious stridency that tightened his sphincter like an alum enema and miraculously flensed him of the impulse to argue.

“Sorry?” she said, as the porters lowered her gently to the narrow strip turf out beside the sidewalk. “Sorry? Jesus, is that the best you can do?”

“Well you did step out in front of my car,” he said, trying to marshal some spine.

She attempted to sit up, then slumped back down, wincing. “You were going too fast!”

“I don’t think so,” he said. “I’m pretty sure I was doing 45—that’s five clicks under the limit. Of course, the GPS will tell for sure.”

At the mention of empirical evidence, she seemed to lose interest in being angry. “Give me a phone, will you?”

Mortals may be promiscuous with their handsets, but for a tribalist, one’s relationship with one’s comm is deeply personal. Art would have sooner shared his underwear. But he had hit her with his car. Reluctantly, Art passed her his comm.

The woman stabbed at the handset with the fingers of her left hand, squinting at it in the dim light. Eventually, she clamped it to her head. “Johnny? It’s Linda. Yes, I’m still in London. How’s tricks out there? Good, good to hear. How’s Marybeth? Oh, that’s too bad. Want to hear how I am?” She grinned devilishly. “I just got hit by a car. No, just now. Five minutes ago. Of course I’m hurt! I think he broke my hip—maybe my spine, too. Yes, I can wiggle my toes. Maybe he shattered a disc and it’s sawing through the cord right now. Concussion? Oh, almost certainly. Pain and suffering, loss of enjoyment of life, missed wages…” She looked up at Art. “You’re insured, right?”

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